Philosophical Latin Phrases

  1. A contrariis - To the contrary (Philosophical term used in logic)
  2. A posse ad esse - From possibility to reality (Philosophical term )
  3. A posteriori - After the fact (Legal term - actions after the fact - also philosophical term: from what is before - Inductive reasoning)
  4. A priori - Before the fact (Legal term - Actions before the fact - First speech - Philosophical term: from what is before - Deductive reasoning)
  5. Ab absurdo - From the absurd (Philosophical term - used in logic to argue that the oposing position is absurd)
  6. Ab esse ad posse valet consequentia - As a consequence of the reality, it is a possibility (Philosophical term - Since it is real, it is possible)
  7. Aliquid quo nihil maius cognitari posit - Somthing which nothing greater can be conceived (Philosophical term - Saint Anselm's argument of the existance of God)
  8. Argumentum a pari - Argument by similarity (Philosophical term used in logic - Argument from similar propositions)
  9. Argumentum ad baculum - Argument by the cane (Legal and Philosophical term - Argument by force or threat)
  10. Argumentum ad consequentiam - Argument to the consequences (Legal and Philosophical term)
  11. Argumentum ad cruneman - Argument to the purse (Legal and Philosophical term - A fallacy that says that something must be true because he who makes it is rich - Compare with argumentum ad lazarum)
  12. Argumentum ad ignorantiam - Argument from ignorance (Philosophical term)
  13. Argumentum ad lazarum - Argument to poverty (Legal and Philosophical term - A fallacy that says that something must be true because he who makes it is poor - Compare with argumentum ad cruneman)
  14. Argumentum ad logicam - Argument to logic (Philosophical term)
  15. Argumentum ad novitatem - Argument to novelty (Philosophical term - Argument which holds that an idea is correct or better simply because it is more modern)
  16. Argumentum petitio Principii - Argument of asking for the beginning (Philosophical term - Fallacy in which one person uses the conclusion as one of the premises to prove his conclusion. It is also called "begging the question", "circular argument" and "vicious circle". In Plato's Phaedo, Socrates incurs such fallacy trying to prove that the soul is immortal)
  17. Beatus ille quem vivere in locus amoenus et carpe diem - Fortunate is the one who lives in a pleasant place and captures the day. (Philosophical term - A mix of several famous phrases to describe a simple way of live: to be happy, without seeking more wealth than those who are around you)
  18. Condicio sine qua non - Condition without which it could not be (Legal and Philosophical term)
  19. Cum hoc ergo propter hoc - With this, therefore because of this (Philosophical Term - A fallacy that confuses cause and effect)
  20. De nihilo nihil fit - You cannot make anything out of nothing (Philosophical term)
  21. Deus dedit, Deus abstulit - God Giveth, God Taketh Away (Philosophical term)
  22. Deus est mortali mortalem iuvare - God is a mortal that helps another mortal (Philosophical term)
  23. Docta ignorantia - On learned ignorance (Philosophical term - Title of a book by Nicolaus Cusanus)
  24. Dubito ergo cogito, cogito ergo sum - I doubt, therefore I think, therefore I am (Rene Descartes - Philosophical term)
  25. Eo ipso - By that fact itself (Philosophical term - By that fact alone)
  26. Ergo - Therefore (Philosophical term used in logic)
  27. Esse est percipi - To be is to be perceived (Philosophical term - Principle developed by the Irish philosopher George Berkeley (1685-1753)
  28. Ex nihilo nihil fit - Nothing comes from nothing (Philosophical term - Saint Thomas Aquinas)
  29. Ex umbra in solem - From the shade into the sun (Philosophical term - To go from ignorance to knowledge - Motto of the University Santa Maria, Chile)
  30. Gigni de nihilo nihil, in nihilum nil posse reverti - Nothing is generated from nothing, nothing returns to nothing (Philosophical term - Persius Satires I, 111, 83)
  31. In esse - In being (Philosophical term - Saint Thomas Aquinas - In existence - Before we are born we are in In posse. After we are born, we are In esse)
  32. In posse - In potential (Philosophical term - Saint Thomas Aquinas - In possible existence before we are born - Before we are born we are in In posse. After we are born, we are In esse)
  33. Ipsum esse subsistens - Subsistent Being itself (Saint Thomas Aquinas - Philosophical term - Essential definition of God given by the scholastics)
  34. Maior sum quam qui mancipium sim corporis mei - I'm too big to be a slave of my body (Philosophical term put forward as the antithesis of the old Socratic thesis that said: The body is the prison of the soul.) )
  35. Modus ponendo ponens / Modus ponens - Mode that affirms by affirming (Philosophical term - Way of logical deduction: the union of two premises such as "If it rains, we will go to the beach" and "It rains". By combining these two by Modus Ponens, it can be concluded that: "We will go to the beach")
  36. Modus ponendo tollens - Mode which affirms by denying (Philosophical term)
  37. Modus tollendo ponens - Mode which denies by affirming (Philosophical term)
  38. Modus tollendo tollens - Mode which denies by denying (Philosophical ter)
  39. Nihil est in intellectu quod prius non fuerit in sensu - There is nothing in the intellect without first passing through the senses (Philosophical term - you cannot grasp a concept without the assistance of the experience)
  40. Non sequitur - Not following (Philosophical term used in logic - Arguments do not lead to the conclusion)
  41. Non sunt entia multiplicanda praeter necessitatem - The simplest solution is probably the correct one (Philosophical term - Ockam's Razor)
  42. Non sunt multiplicanda entia sine necessitate - We must not multiply things without a need (Philosophical term - Ockam's Razor)
  43. O miserum te si intelligis, miserum si no intelligis! - ˇOh miserable you, if you understand and also if you don't understand! (Philosophical term - Paradoxical proverb commonly expressed by the metaphysical thinkers of Rome, which spent much on trying to resolve problems and also to explain them, once they understood them)
  44. Omnes volumus plus. Et plus, et plus et plurimus - We all want more. And more, and more and much more (Philosophical term - Human insatiability: "The more you have, the more you want”)
  45. Per accidens - By accident (Philosophical term used in logic - By external force - Compare with per se)
  46. Per se - In and of itself (Philosophical term used in logic - Essential, True without having to refer to something else - Compare with per accidens)
  47. Post hoc, ergo propter hoc - After this, therefore as consequence of (Philosophical term used in logic - indicates a fallacy in reasoning, the preceding events could be irrelevant to the supposed effect)
  48. Primum vivere, deinde philosophari! - Live first and philosophize later (Philosophical term)

Total: 48


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